President’s message: Your membership and donations benefit an amazing neighborhood

The Sierra Curtis Neighborhood Association has grown by leaps and bounds in the past several years. We hit a financial milestone last month when the board voted to pass a plan with seven-digit expenditures and revenue — in Silicon Valley parlance, a two- comma budget.

While this may seem like chump change in these days of unicorn start-ups, it shows that SCNA has increased its reach and its grasp to benefit our community in expanding and more diverse ways. I’d like to spend my 400 words telling you a little about where your money goes when you donate — whether through your membership, the Big Day of Giving or otherwise — and how it helps Curtis Park and the surrounding community.

First, let’s talk trees. Curtis Park has an incredible urban canopy with a wide variety of trees: gingko, plum, lemon, sycamore, oak, redwood, elm… ah, the elm. SCNA has spent thousands of dollars over the past several years giving regular treatments to the towering Dutch Elms in the park, to help stave off the dreaded Dutch Elm disease. There have been several instances of Dutch Elm disease in the neighborhood already, and these expensive treatments are essential to keep these stately icons happy and healthy.

The Association also produces events over the course of each year. Some of these make money, and some don’t. Probably the highest profile net- negative event is the annual Easter egg hunt/dash at Sierra 2. SCNA funds buy the eggs, art supplies, snacks and other little things that make it so successful. First Fridays, Concerts in the Park and other non-revenue generating community events all wouldn’t happen without your support.

Of course, the deathless prose you’re holding in your hands right now is a beneficiary of your donations. The Viewpoint is staffed by volunteer writers and editors, but there are layout and printing costs. Advertising defrays some, but not all of those costs. Subsidies from SCNA make it possible for this newspaper to be delivered to your doorstep 10 times a year.

If you’re not a member of SCNA — and a majority of households in Curtis Park are not — then you’re already reaping many of the membership benefits just by virtue of having access to our programs and activities. While the Free Rider is a venerable problem in most economic systems, I encourage you to become a paid rider, and help support all the amazing things SCNA does to make Curtis Park the best place to live in Sacramento.

Categorized: Blog, Board Meeting Notes, Neighborhood News, Neighborhood Preservation and History, Sierra 2, Trees, ViewpointTagged: